Archive for December 25, 2014

Merry Christmas! Happy Hanukkah! Happy Kwanza! Happy HOLIDAYS!

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Merry Christmas! Happy Hanukkah! Happy Kwanza! Happy HOLIDAYS!

At Elderly Care Resources, we’re here for you. Provide you information and links to things that may be of some help for you, especially if you’re a care giver, or an elderly person. It’s amazing how difficult things can be to navigate, especially when it comes to insurance and medical issues. We hope your holidays have been wonderful, and you’ve given as much love as you’ve received!

As some of you know, we write a lot about issues we have dealt with, or are currently dealing with. With the recent beating of the Matriarch of our family, you will notice an increase of posts about elderly abuse and violence, how to spot it happening, and how to stop it before something bad happens. We’ll cover nursing homes and medication policies, and how without notice, your family member may be put on heavy medications without your knowledge, or their own personal consent. If you are a blogger, and blog about anything just mentioned, please contact our page and consider becoming a guest blogger! We’d love to have your post!

Be safe this holiday season. Pay attention to phone scams, and anyone paying too much attention to your home. If you’ve ordered packages, try to be home when they are to be delivered to avoid package theft from your very own porch. Don’t answer knocks on your door at night. Get a life alert, or similar police dispatching button. Please lock your doors ALL the time. Don’t leave your keys in your unlocked car, in your unlocked garage. Don’t talk about the money that’s in your purse with anyone.

Have a SAFE & WONDERFUL holiday season!! Merry Christmas!

Pneumonia: The Silent Killer

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Pneumonia: The Silent Killer

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This is the season that brings so many weather changes to many states and areas, and often towards the snowy and cold side of things. Cold weather and being cooped up inside heated houses causes all the bacteria and germs to circulate more frequently. This means, those who are in close quarters in a job, or in the same facility like a hospital or nursing home have a higher probability of catching each others germs, thusly creating mixed illnesses. The best prevention is often knowledge on how to avoid the spread of germs in the first place. In the elderly, pneumonia can be especially tricky, as it can mimic many other issues. Know the causes. Know the Symptoms.

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Symptoms.

  • Fever, sweating and shaking chills
  • Lower than normal body temperature in people older than age 65, and in people with poor overall health or weakened immune systems
  • Cough, which may produce thick, sticky fluid
  • Chest pain when you breathe deeply or cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Fatigue and muscle aches
  • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea
  • Headache

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Causes of Pneumonia.

  • Bacteria; such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. Bacterial community-acquired pneumonia can occur on its own or after you have a cold or respiratory flu. This type of pneumonia often affects one area (lobe) of the lung, a condition called lobar pneumonia.
  • Bacteria-like organisms; such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which typically produce milder signs and symptoms than do other types of pneumonia. “Walking pneumonia,” a term used to describe pneumonia that isn’t severe enough to require bed rest, may result from Mycoplasma pneumoniae.
  • Viruses; including some that are the same type of viruses that cause colds and flu. Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in children younger than 2 years. Viral pneumonia is usually mild. But viral pneumonia caused by certain influenza viruses, such as sudden acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), can become very serious.
  • Fungi; which can be found in soil and in bird droppings. This type of pneumonia is most common in people with an underlying health problem or weakened immune system and in people who have inhaled a large dose of the organisms.

Complications from Pneumonia.

  • Bacteria in the bloodstream (bacteremia). Bacteria that enter the bloodstream from your lungs can spread the infection to other organs, potentially causing organ failure.
  • Lung abscess. An abscess occurs if pus forms in a cavity in the lung. An abscess is usually treated with antibiotics. Sometimes, surgery or drainage with a long needle or tube placed into the abscess is needed to remove the pus.
  • Fluid accumulation around your lungs (pleural effusion). Pneumonia may cause fluid to build up in the thin space between layers of tissue that line the lungs and chest cavity (pleura). If the fluid becomes infected, you may need to have it drained through a chest tube or removed with surgery.
  • Difficulty breathing. If your pneumonia is severe or you have chronic underlying lung diseases, you may have trouble breathing in enough oxygen. You may need to be hospitalized and use a mechanical ventilator while your lung heals.

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